The Big Beat- Online Radio Show with DJ Kingblind

Diabolus in musica- E10 P1 (Digital)

September 24, 2020 DJ Kingblind Episode 19
The Big Beat- Online Radio Show with DJ Kingblind
Diabolus in musica- E10 P1 (Digital)
Chapters
The Big Beat- Online Radio Show with DJ Kingblind
Diabolus in musica- E10 P1 (Digital)
Sep 24, 2020 Episode 19
DJ Kingblind

DJ Kingblind presents- The Big Beat online radio show-(Epi 19) This week we talk about & play the best music in a themed Dj set called "Diabolus in musica" Let’s face it. When it comes to creating a creepy musical atmosphere, the modern pop canon doesn’t have much to work with. Fortunately, ye olde Europeans liked their music a lot more chilling than “Thriller.” In fact, during the 19th century, it was composers like Franz Liszt and Richard Wagner who truly cracked the code of creepiness. The sonic dread they pioneered involved two key ingredients that horror movies and metal bands still use today: a forbidden sequence of notes known as “Satan in music,” and a spooky little ditty that Gregorian monks sang about. A tritone or triad in and of itself is nothing diabolical.  It is merely three whole tones, a starting note plus the third and fifth tones found along its scale (e.g. C, E, G).  Very harmonious.  But when you make the tritone “restless” say by playing (C, E-flat, G-flat) you get a rather unnerving dissonance and our brains wonder when the harmonious chord will come along to provide a peaceful resolution.  When it never comes, we get all agitated, and this is why it has traditionally been used to represent something sinister. This episode we talk about the evoluton of this "evil chord" in modern day music and how songs can be Beautiful & Haunting while using parts of these musical notes. Visit us online at www.djkingblind.com or search DJ Kingblind in your favorite podcast app. 

Show Notes

DJ Kingblind presents- The Big Beat online radio show-(Epi 19) This week we talk about & play the best music in a themed Dj set called "Diabolus in musica" Let’s face it. When it comes to creating a creepy musical atmosphere, the modern pop canon doesn’t have much to work with. Fortunately, ye olde Europeans liked their music a lot more chilling than “Thriller.” In fact, during the 19th century, it was composers like Franz Liszt and Richard Wagner who truly cracked the code of creepiness. The sonic dread they pioneered involved two key ingredients that horror movies and metal bands still use today: a forbidden sequence of notes known as “Satan in music,” and a spooky little ditty that Gregorian monks sang about. A tritone or triad in and of itself is nothing diabolical.  It is merely three whole tones, a starting note plus the third and fifth tones found along its scale (e.g. C, E, G).  Very harmonious.  But when you make the tritone “restless” say by playing (C, E-flat, G-flat) you get a rather unnerving dissonance and our brains wonder when the harmonious chord will come along to provide a peaceful resolution.  When it never comes, we get all agitated, and this is why it has traditionally been used to represent something sinister. This episode we talk about the evoluton of this "evil chord" in modern day music and how songs can be Beautiful & Haunting while using parts of these musical notes. Visit us online at www.djkingblind.com or search DJ Kingblind in your favorite podcast app.